Social Security Disability benefits are specifically for people who have a disability that prevents them from working, so it is reasonable to wonder if you can work in Alabama and still receive your benefits. Because the SSDI rules say that a qualifying disability is something that will last for up to one year, it is possible to have a disability that gets better and allows you to go back to work.

The Social Security Administration realizes this and allows you to go back to work under its trial work system. Trial work has rules on how long you may continue to get benefits while working. The goal is to help you try to go back to work but to also provide support in case you are not able to do so.

The rules

The trial work period allows you to receive your full benefits while you work. This period lasts nine months, but they do not have to be consecutive. The months can add up over 60 months. A month counts as a trial month if you earn over a certain amount of money or work more than 80 hours in one month. The amount you can earn changes, and if you are blind, the limit is higher, so always check with the SSA for the current income limit.

Once you reach the nine-month limit, you will no longer get your benefits unless your earnings fall below a set limit. If you do stop working due to your disability during this time, you need to let the SSA know, and your benefits will restart without having to complete a new application.

The SSA does not cut off your benefits the minute you get a job, which is very helpful if you are unsure if you will be able to return to work for the long term. The trail work system allows you to give work a try and see if you are ready to go back to the workforce.