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Inguinal hernias remain the most common hernia diagnosis you may come across. However, femoral hernia continues to pose a threat to thousands of Americans, every year. Doctors may begin evaluating the possibility of a femoral hernia diagnosis if you have a bulge in the groin.

According to a study published by the National Library of Medicine, it accounts for only 3% of all hernia diagnosis. Doctors may detect this type of hernia during regular physical exams. Surprisingly, a third of patients do not even know they have a hernia at the time.

Who is more at risk?

Men face an overwhelmingly higher risk of hernia than women. Women have a lifetime occurrence of up to 6%. Men, in contrast, have a lifetime occurrence of up to 43%. In spite of this, women seem more likely to have a femoral hernia. Researchers believe the female-to-male ratio stands at about 10:1.

Is there a connection with a femoral hernia?

If you become diagnosed with a femoral hernia, there is a high likelihood you may later develop an inguinal hernia. Despite the higher likelihood of this specific type of hernia among women, men have a higher likelihood of complications. Roughly half of men later develop an inguinal hernia, compared to just 10% of women.

How do doctors treat a femoral hernia?

Doctors rely on the use of a hernia mesh. This involves dissecting the hernia sac and attempting to reduce its size. The doctor may then close the wound and use a prosthetic mesh. While this remains the most common form of treatment, researchers identified mesh infection as a common risk factor.

To reduce the likelihood of mesh infection, doctors generally reconsider this method in cases involving a compromised bowel. Note that up to 4% of elective surgery cases for femoral or inguinal repairs result in infections at the surgical site. Early detection can make all the difference.